University offers free breakfasts for students

University of the West of Scotland says twice-weekly meals are a response to cost-of-living crisis

September 26, 2022
Fresh crispy croissants with red berry jam on slate board, pink background
Source: iStock

A Scottish university is offering its students free breakfasts as the cost-of-living crisis bites.

The University of the West of Scotland said that it would offer students free continental breakfasts at its Ayr and Paisley campuses on Tuesdays and Thursdays, so long as they can make it to campus between 8.30am and 9.30am.

“With costs increasing in many areas of life, we are hopeful that this will make a small difference in ensuring our students are fuelled up for the day ahead,” said Lucy Meredith, UWS’ interim principal.

“Not only will they have a healthy kick-start to their day, but breakfast is known to positively impact learning and general health.

“Research shows the impact skipping breakfast can have on learning and this initiative demonstrates our commitment to the mental and physical well-being of our students.”

The initiative comes amid mounting concern about the impact of the cost-of-living crisis on students, with universities having decried the Westminster government’s failure to announce additional support in its 23 September financial statement.

Vice-chancellors have warned that students risk becoming a “forgotten group” as inflation drives household bills upwards. Polling conducted for Universities UK indicates that 67 per cent of students say they are concerned about managing living costs this term, while 55 per cent say they could be forced to abandon their studies as a result.

Rebecca Grant, president of the UWS Students’ Union, welcomed the initiative.

“We are delighted to see the Breakfast Club launching at the university to support our students. It will bring so many benefits and it’s a great opportunity to catch up with classmates and students from the wider UWS community,” she said.

chris.havergal@timeshighereducation.com

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